AT Inks offers after-market eco-solvent, bio-solvent, full solvent inks to reduce costs in a tough economy. Print

AT Inks was an ink company recognized worldwide


I have noticed the AT Ink booth at trade shows around the world circa 2005-2009. the last five years. So I discretely began to ask around and keep my eyes and ears open, and learned that this company was recognized for their ink. Plus, the individuals and company behind the ink was a family-owned business.
AT Inks is the name which expresses the wider range of inks than the original name Aqua Tint Inks. The corporate name is Rex-Tone.

Five years ago I spent several days in India visiting their two factories. I could not help but notice that the ink processing equipment was from Germany and of comparable industrial quality.

AT Inks, after-market third-party
AT inks booth at SGIA trade show 2009.
AT Inks, after-market third-party eco-solvent, mild lite-solvent inks, refill cartridges, compare price comparisons
AT Inks, showing some products at FESPA Amsterdam 2009.

Site-visit case study
I then visited an end-user (who had several Gandinnovations Jeti printers, and discussed with the owner how the AT Inks were dependable. Indeed he said that for his D.G.I. PolaJet solvent printer the AT Inks were better than the original Toyo inks (what clogged too much).

Here is the Gandinnovations Jeti 3312 solvent printer at Amitoje Creations site visit in India. This company uses the AT Inks for several printers Gandy and D.G.I..
According to the comments of the printer operator from Imagen Visible, one benefit of this ink in addition to its price and consumption economy, is the higher quality than the previously used since it doesn´t clog the nozzles as often as the other. In this photo the HP Scitex Grand at Imagen Visible in Guatemala city.

After-market third-party inks in general
During a recession it helps to control costs. So using an after-market ink is a natural decision. The question is which brand? This is why FLAAR makes the effort to check out ink companies, one by one.

How does FLAAR decide which ink to study?
The first step is to see which ink companies are successful enough to exhibit at major trade shows around the world.  If an ink company exhibits only in one or two shows, and only in one or two areas of the world, we tend to skip these companies because our readership at FLAAR is from over 62 countries. So we look for after-market inks that are available in most continents and countries.
The second aspect is to check around in the industry. What do other companies say about the ink and about the company.

The third aspect is to learn who are the individuals behind the ink. What about the ethics of the company management. We respect the right of every businessman and woman to act the way they wish, but there are dozens of ink companies and if the management are not collegial then there are plenty of other ink companies who are.  I would list AT Inks, InkWin, Sam Ink, and Triangle as having the kind of ethical individuals at the ownership, CEO, and management levels that we prefer to interact with. These international ink companies also have the knowledge and experience in ink chemistry. The original owner of Triangle has evidently left in late 2013, so we need to learn more about the new leadership there.
Here is Javier Gamez (Director), Eduardo Camacho (Manager) and Nicholas Hellmuth at Imagen Visible S.A. site visit. Dr. Hellmuth inspects a user of AT Inks in person. This is the third inspection of this successful billboard and POP signage printing company this month. The purpose is to take notes on how they like AT Inks in their HP Scitex Grand solvent printer.

The top management of this printshop in Guatemala said quite clearly that AT Inks had better flow then the previous ink they used (Triangle INX). So less clogging. And that AT Inks had better color than their previous inks.

Greenwashing is another minus-point

We have a separate web page on Greenwashing. Too many ink companies have fallen into claiming their inks are eco-friendly.

AT Inks is not exhibiting as often any more
The first crucial aspect of judging an ink company is its presence at trade shows. AT Inks was prominent for many many years. But within the last several years they had almost fewer booths at major international expos.

There was no AT Inks booth at SGIA 2013 in USA; none at the Dubai 2014 expo; and they were not present at D-PES (not surprising since this is a Chinese expo). But recently I learned that AT Inks may not be exhibiting at APPPEXPO 2014. They had not merely a booth in all past years, they had a prominent 2-story booth structure across from HP.

Perhaps their marketing focus is different (selling to companies for re-branding). In this case they would not need a booth as often. Or perhaps they are focusing on certain world areas, and exhibit in these selected world areas.

But since other ink companies are increasing presence, this understandably raises the question of why do some ink companies grow their presence, and others drop their presence?

We hope they are doing okay, since the family was always hospitable, but the basic tenets of evaluation use trade show presence as an initial indicator. End-user comments, and what distributors report are other indicators.

Updated March 2014 after noticing that AT Inks exhibited less often in 2012-2014 and will not exhibit at APPPEXPO 2014 in Shanghai.
First written February 2010 after inspecting the two ink production facilities of AT Inks and after visiting an end-user that commented on how these inks were better than a Japanese ink brand he had used previously.
Updated May 2010 after visiting a second print-shop that was using AT Inks.

 Updated May 12, 2010 after visiting a second print-shop that was using AT Inks.
First written February 2010 after inspecting the two ink production facilities of AT Inks and after visiting an end-user that commented on how these inks were better than a Japanese ink brand he had uses previously.